Link to section 'File Storage and Transfer for Data Depot' of 'File Storage and Transfer' File Storage and Transfer for Data Depot

Link to section 'Archive and Compression' of 'Archive and Compression' Archive and Compression

There are several options for archiving and compressing groups of files or directories on ITaP research systems. The mostly commonly used options are:

Link to section 'tar' of 'Archive and Compression' tar

See the official documentation for tar for more information.

Saves many files together into a single archive file, and restores individual files from the archive. Includes automatic archive compression/decompression options and special features for incremental and full backups.

Examples:


  (list contents of archive somefile.tar)
$ tar tvf somefile.tar

  (extract contents of somefile.tar)
$ tar xvf somefile.tar

  (extract contents of gzipped archive somefile.tar.gz)
$ tar xzvf somefile.tar.gz

  (extract contents of bzip2 archive somefile.tar.bz2)
$ tar xjvf somefile.tar.bz2

  (archive all ".c" files in current directory into one archive file)
$ tar cvf somefile.tar *.c

  (archive and gzip-compress all files in a directory into one archive file)
$ tar czvf somefile.tar.gz somedirectory/

  (archive and bzip2-compress all files in a directory into one archive file)
$ tar cjvf somefile.tar.bz2 somedirectory/

Other arguments for tar can be explored by using the man tar command.

Link to section 'gzip' of 'Archive and Compression' gzip

  (more information)

The standard compression system for all GNU software.

Examples:


  (compress file somefile - also removes uncompressed file)
$ gzip somefile

  (uncompress file somefile.gz - also removes compressed file)
$ gunzip somefile.gz

Link to section 'bzip2' of 'Archive and Compression' bzip2

See the official documentation for bzip for more information.

Strong, lossless data compressor based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform. Stronger compression than gzip.

Examples:


  (compress file somefile - also removes uncompressed file)
$ bzip2 somefile

  (uncompress file somefile.bz2 - also removes compressed file)
$ bunzip2 somefile.bz2

There are several other, less commonly used, options available as well:

  • zip
  • 7zip
  • xz

Link to section 'Sharing Files from Data Depot' of 'Sharing' Sharing Files from Data Depot

Data Depot supports several methods for file sharing. Use the links below to learn more about these methods.

Link to section 'Sharing Data with Globus' of 'Globus' Sharing Data with Globus

Data on any Research Computing resource can be shared with other users within Purdue or with collaborators at other institutions. Globus allows convenient sharing of data with outside collaborators. Data can be shared with collaborators' personal computers or directly with many other computing resources at other institutions.

To share files, login to https://transfer.rcac.purdue.edu, navigate to the endpoint (collection) of your choice, and follow instructions as described in Globus documentation on how to share data:

Link to section 'Sharing static content from your Data Depot space via the WWW' of 'WWW' Sharing static content from your Data Depot space via the WWW

Your research group can easily share static files (images, data, HTML) from your depot space via the WWW.

  • Contact rcac-help@purdue.edu to set up a "www" folder in your Data Depot space.
  • Copy any files that you wish to share via the WWW into your Data Depot space's "www" folder.
  • For example, cp /path/to/image.jpg /depot/mylab/www/, where mylab is your research group name.
  • or upload to smb://datadepot.rcac.purdue.edu/depot/mylab/www, where mylab is your research group name.
  • Your file is now accessible via your web browser at the URL https://www.datadepot.rcac.purdue.edu/mylab/image.jpg

Note that it is not possible to run web sites, dynamic content, interpreters (PHP, Perl, Python), or CGI scripts from this web site.

File Transfer

Data Depot supports several methods for file transfer. Use the links below to learn more about these methods.

SCP

SCP (Secure CoPy) is a simple way of transferring files between two machines that use the SSH protocol. SCP is available as a protocol choice in some graphical file transfer programs and also as a command line program on most Linux, Unix, and Mac OS X systems. SCP can copy single files, but will also recursively copy directory contents if given a directory name.

Command-line usage:


  (to a remote system from local)
$ scp sourcefilename myusername@data.rcac.purdue.edu:somedirectory/destinationfilename

  (from a remote system to local)
$ scp myusername@data.rcac.purdue.edu:somedirectory/sourcefilename destinationfilename

  (recursive directory copy to a remote system from local)
$ scp -r sourcedirectory/ myusername@data.rcac.purdue.edu:somedirectory/

Linux / Solaris / AIX / HP-UX / Unix:

  • The "scp" command-line program should already be installed.

Microsoft Windows:

  • MobaXterm
    Free, full-featured, graphical Windows SSH, SCP, and SFTP client.

Mac OS X:

  • You should have already installed the "scp" command-line program. You may start a local terminal window from "Applications->Utilities".
  • Cyberduck is a full-featured and free graphical SFTP and SCP client.

Globus

Globus, previously known as Globus Online, is a powerful and easy to use file transfer service for transferring files virtually anywhere. It works within ITaP's various research storage systems; it connects between ITaP and remote research sites running Globus; and it connects research systems to personal systems. You may use Globus to connect to your home, scratch, and Fortress storage directories. Since Globus is web-based, it works on any operating system that is connected to the internet. The Globus Personal client is available on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. It is primarily used as a graphical means of transfer but it can also be used over the command line.

Link to section 'Globus Web:' of 'Globus' Globus Web:

  • Navigate to http://transfer.rcac.purdue.edu
  • Click "Proceed" to log in with your Purdue Career Account.
  • On your first login it will ask to make a connection to a Globus account. If you already have one - sign in to associate with your Career Account. Otherwise, click the link to create a new account.
  • Now you are at the main screen. Click "File Transfer" which will bring you to a two-endpoint interface.
  • You will need to select one endpoint on one side as the source, and a second endpoint on the other as the destination. This can be one of several Purdue endpoints or another University or your personal computer (see Personal Client section below).

The ITaP Research Computing endpoints are as follows. A search for "Purdue" will give you several suggested results you can choose from, or you can give a more specific search.

  • Research Data Depot: "Purdue Research Computing - Data Depot", a search for "Depot" should provide appropriate matches to choose from.
  • Fortress: "Purdue Fortress HPPS Archive", a search for "Fortress" should provide appropriate matches to choose from.

From here, select a file or folder in either side of the two-pane window, and then use the arrows in the top-middle of the interface to instruct Globus to move files from one side to the other. You can transfer files in either direction. You will receive an email once the transfer is completed.

Link to section 'Globus Personal Client setup:' of 'Globus' Globus Personal Client setup:

Globus Connect Personal is a small software tool you can install to make your own computer a Globus endpoint on its own. It is useful if you need to transfer files via Globus to and from your computer directly.

  • On the endpoint page from earlier, click "Get Globus Connect Personal" or download a version for your operating system it from here: Globus Connect Personal
  • Name this particular personal system and follow the setup prompts to create your Globus Connect Personal endpoint.
  • Your personal system is now available as an endpoint within the Globus transfer interface.

Link to section 'Globus Command Line:' of 'Globus' Globus Command Line:

Globus supports command line interface, allowing advanced automation of your transfers.

To use the recommended standalone Globus CLI application (the globus command):

Link to section 'Sharing Data with Outside Collaborators' of 'Globus' Sharing Data with Outside Collaborators

Globus allows convenient sharing of data with outside collaborators. Data can be shared with collaborators' personal computers or directly with many other computing resources at other intstitutions. See the Globus documentation on how to share data:

For links to more information, please see Globus Support page.

Windows Network Drive / SMB

SMB (Server Message Block), also known as CIFS, is an easy to use file transfer protocol that is useful for transferring files between ITaP research systems and a desktop or laptop. You may use SMB to connect to your home, scratch, and Fortress storage directories. The SMB protocol is available on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. It is primarily used as a graphical means of transfer but it can also be used over the command line.

Note: to access Data Depot through SMB file sharing, you must be on a Purdue campus network or connected through VPN.

Link to section 'Windows:' of 'Windows Network Drive / SMB' Windows:

  • Windows 7: Click Windows menu > Computer, then click Map Network Drive in the top bar
  • Windows 8 & 10: Tap the Windows key, type computer, select This PC, click Computer > Map Network Drive in the top bar
  • In the folder location enter the following information and click Finish:

    • To access your Data Depot directory, enter \\datadepot.rcac.purdue.edu\depot\mylab where mylab is your research group name.

  • Your Data Depot directory should now be mounted as a drive in the Computer window.

Link to section 'Mac OS X:' of 'Windows Network Drive / SMB' Mac OS X:

  • In the Finder, click Go > Connect to Server
  • In the Server Address enter the following information and click Connect:

    • To access your Data Depot directory, enter smb://datadepot.rcac.purdue.edu/depot/mylab where mylab is your research group name.

Link to section 'Linux:' of 'Windows Network Drive / SMB' Linux:

  • There are several graphical methods to connect in Linux depending on your desktop environment. Once you find out how to connect to a network server on your desktop environment, choose the Samba/SMB protocol and adapt the information from the Mac OS X section to connect.
  • If you would like access via samba on the command line you may install smbclient which will give you FTP-like access and can be used as shown below. For all the possible ways to connect look at the Mac OS X instructions.
    smbclient //datadepot.rcac.purdue.edu/depot/ -U myusername
    cd mylab

FTP / SFTP

ITaP does not support FTP on any ITaP research systems because it does not allow for secure transmission of data. Use SFTP instead, as described below.

SFTP (Secure File Transfer Protocol) is a reliable way of transferring files between two machines. SFTP is available as a protocol choice in some graphical file transfer programs and also as a command-line program on most Linux, Unix, and Mac OS X systems. SFTP has more features than SCP and allows for other operations on remote files, remote directory listing, and resuming interrupted transfers. Command-line SFTP cannot recursively copy directory contents; to do so, try using SCP or graphical SFTP client.

Command-line usage:

$ sftp -B buffersize myusername@data.rcac.purdue.edu

      (to a remote system from local)
sftp> put sourcefile somedir/destinationfile
sftp> put -P sourcefile somedir/

      (from a remote system to local)
sftp> get sourcefile somedir/destinationfile
sftp> get -P sourcefile somedir/

sftp> exit
  • -B: optional, specify buffer size for transfer; larger may increase speed, but costs memory
  • -P: optional, preserve file attributes and permissions

Linux / Solaris / AIX / HP-UX / Unix:

  • The "sftp" command-line program should already be installed.

Microsoft Windows:

  • MobaXterm
    Free, full-featured, graphical Windows SSH, SCP, and SFTP client.

Mac OS X:

  • The "sftp" command-line program should already be installed. You may start a local terminal window from "Applications->Utilities".
  • Cyberduck is a full-featured and free graphical SFTP and SCP client.
Helpful?

Thanks for letting us know.

Please don’t include any personal information in your comment. Maximum character limit is 250.
Characters left: 250
Thanks for your feedback.